Tagalog 101: How to say, “Where is the bathroom?” or “May I please go to the bathroom?”

 please wait for 10 seconds and press the play button above, thank you!

source: http://www.iabp.info/bathroom-sign/

source: http://www.iabp.info/bathroom-sign/

Welcome to Tagalog 101

Since the Filipinos already adapted the English words – comfort room, bathroom, toilet, restroom and wash room, there’s no need to translate these words at all.
So what you need to do is just translate “WHERE IS” in Tagalog.

Where is – “Saan ang”
Or “nasaan ang”
Or “saan po ang” for a more respectful tone.

Saan po ang bathroom?

Saan po ang cr? CR stands for comfort room

Saan po ang comfort room?

Saan po ang toilet?

Saan po ang wash room?

The most common used term I heard in the malls if you want to pee, is –

Saan po ang restroom?

So all of this are correct, you can choose any English words equivalent to toilet. Just don’t forget “saan po” if you want to ask.

If you want to ask the home owner that you would like to use their bathroom
You can say,
“pwede po bang maki-cr?”
or
“pwede po bang pa cr?”
Both of these are correct.
When they said yes, you can say
“saan po ang cr?”
But in the Philippines, you just ask where is the bathroom located and it is understood that you wanna go to the bathroom.

Here is an example

Sofie: Saan po ang CR? Pwede pong maki-cr?

M: Diretso ka lang, yung pulang pinto sa kanan, cr yun. (You just walk straight ahead, the red door to the right is the comfort room)

Further more, the native Filipino people also use –
Batalan- (definition) the rear of barrio house for washing and for storage of water

Banyo – (definition) bathroom; shower room

Or paliguan – (definition)  shower room

If you don’t want to take a shower, you just want to just pee-
You can also call it

kubeta

kasilyas

palikuran

which means toilet.

 

Tagalog 101: How to say thank you, you’re welcome and goodbye in Tagalog

thank you, you're welcom, goodbye in tagalog

Magandang araw!

Welcome to mommysaiddaddysaid.com’s Tagalog 101. Today we are going to learn how to say thank you, you’re welcome and goodbye in Tagalog.

How do we say “thank you” in Tagalog?

Sa-la-mat!

Salamat!

Salamat!

 

Here is an example

K: Ang galing mong mag-tagalog (In English, you’re very good in speaking Tagalog)

P: Salamat (in English, thank you)

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Now, How do we say “you’re welcome” in Tagalog?

Wa-lang a-nu-man.

Walang anuman…

Walang anuman…

 

Walang anuman literally means,” “it’s nothing” or no “trouble”

 

Here is an example

K: Ang galing mong mag-tagalog (in English, you’re very good in speaking Tagalog)

P: Salamat (in English, thank you)

K: Walang anuman (in English, you’re welcome, it’s nothing or no trouble)

 

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How do we say “goodbye” in Tagalog?

Pa-a-lam

Paalam

Paalam

 

Listen carefully and note that this is already a modern Tagalog conversation, thus, some English words are used as well.

During lunch break…

P: Ken, SALAMAT sa lunch, masarap yung mga pagkain na napili mo.

K: WALANG ANUMAN. Masaya ako at nakapaglunch tayo. Next time, ikaw naman ang taya ha?

P: Oo sige ba… O paano, alis na ako ha, PAALAM!

 

From this conversation, Ken and Paula had lunch together.

Paula ‘thanked’ Ken and told him that the food was great, Ken said “you’re welcome” to Paula and next time, she’ll be the one who’ll pay the bill. Paula agreed and said “goodbye” to Ken.

 

Okay beginners, are you catching up? Somehow you’ll get an idea about the conversation using the context clues. We’ll say it again, one at a time. You can repeat the words in every pause.

P: Ken, SALAMAT sa lunch, masarap yung mga pagkain na napili mo. (Ken, thanks for the lunch, the food that you picked was delicious) here, SALAMAT or THANK YOU was mentioned. “SALAMAT”

K: WALANG ANUMAN. Masaya ako at nakasama kita. Next time, ikaw naman ang taya okay? (You’re welcome, I’m happy that I’m with you, next time, you treat me too, okay?) here, WALANG ANUMAN or YOU’RE WELCOME was mentioned. “WALANG ANUMAN”

 

P: Oo sige ba… O paano, alis na ako ha, PAALAM! (Yes, Sure! I have to go now okay? Goodbye!) here, PAALAM or GOODBYE was mentioned. “PAALAM”

 

How do you find our lesson for today? We appreciate your comments and suggestions, feel free to write in the comment box below. SALAMAT sa pakikinig at PAALAM sa inyong lahat.

Tagalog 101: KUMUSTA

Tagalog 101- kumusta

 

We Filipinos are fond of having a conversation with almost everyone we meet.  We love exchanging “HIs and HELLOs…” and expect us to always be there to keep you company if you need someone to talk to. The warm exchange of HOW ARE YOUs means a lot for us. Even if the conversation ends just right there, it makes our day a little lighter.

 

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(press the play button to listen)

Here’s little background of the Filipino language based on the Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_the_Philippines)

Spanish was the national and official language of the country for more than three centuries under Spanish colonial rule… It was established that Spanish was spoken by a total of 60% of the population in the early 20th century as a first, second or third language. Following the American occupation of the Philippines and the imposition of English, the use of Spanish declined gradually, especially after the 1940s.

So let’s move forward. Now that we’re in the 21st century, do we still speak Spanish? Not anymore, but I have observed that there some words similar to Spanish like how you say “HOW ARE YOU”

In Spanish: ¿cómo está senor

In Tagalog: Kumusta ginoo?

In English: How are you, sir?

Notice that como esta and kumusta, almost sounded the same?

 

You can add the word “KA” pertaining to the person you are talking to.

Person A: Kumusta KA?

Person B: Mabuti naman ako… (I’m good) At Ikaw? (And you?)

Person A: Mabuti naman… Salamat (I’m good too, thank you!)

 

Most of the time, we drop the words “KA” and “AT”

 

Here’s the formal “How are you” in tagalog (with KA and AT)

Person A: Kumusta KA?

Person B: Mabuti naman ako… (I’m good) At Ikaw? (And you?)

Person A: Mabuti naman… Salamat (I’m good too, thank you!)

 

Here’s the short and modern way of saying it

Person A: Kumusta?

Person B: Mabuti naman ako… (I’m good) Ikaw? (And you?)

Person A: Ayos lang… Salamat! (I’m good too, thank you!)

 

Soon, we will learn how to use “po at opo.” (we use these words to show respect to the person we are speaking with)

We will teach you the basic Tagalog first to avoid confusion.

Watch out for our next module, How to say thank you and goodbye in Tagalog. Until next time, Mabuhay!

TAGALOG 101 : History of Tagalog / Filipino Language and the Modern Filipino Alphabet

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Most of the Filipinos know Tagalog. The very one thing I failed to teach my children. But this works to our advantage for now because if there’s an urgent topic I want to discuss with my husband, speaking Tagalog comes in handy. Eventually, my children will learn how to speak our mother tongue thus, the reason for this tutorial.

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(press the play button to listen)

Before we learn the Tagalog or the Filipino language, let us first know the meaning of “tagalog.”

The word Tagalog is derived from the endonym taga-ilog (“river dweller”)it is  composed of tagá- (“native of” or “from”) and ílog (“river”). Very little is known about the ancient history of the language.

Tagalog is classified as the language within the Austronesian language family. A composition of  Malayo-Polynesian, MalagasyJavaneseIndonesianMalayTetum of Timor, and Tao language of Taiwan. (reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tagalog_language)

Aside from these roots, the modern Tagalog language is also comprised of so many words  from the other languages. Since the Philippines have been colonized by countries such as the America and the Spain being the longest, our language has also evolved. We will encounter these words as we go along.

The evolution of the Filipino Alphabet

A long time ago, what the native Filipinos are using is what we call the “Baybayin” alphabet, it has been replaced by the “Latin” alphabet which is easier to read.

The Evolution of the Filipino Alphabet

The "Baybayin" Alphabet - Type of writing system: syllabic alphabet in which each consonant has an inherent vowel /a/. Other vowels are indicated either by separate letters, or by dots - a dot over a consonant changes the vowels to an /i/ or and /e/, while a dot under a consonant changes the vowel to /o/ or /u/. The inherent vowel is muted by adding a + sign beneath a consonant. This innovation was introduced by the Spanish. Direction of writing: left to right in horizontal lines. (source : http://www.omniglot.com/writing/tagalog.htm)

The “Baybayin” Alphabet – Type of writing system: syllabic alphabet in which each consonant has an inherent vowel /a/. Other vowels are indicated either by separate letters, or by dots – a dot over a consonant changes the vowels to an /i/ or and /e/, while a dot under a consonant changes the vowel to /o/ or /u/.
The inherent vowel is muted by adding a + sign beneath a consonant. This innovation was introduced by the Spanish.
Direction of writing: left to right in horizontal lines (credits:http://www.omniglot.com/writing/tagalog.htm)

 

Latin alphabet for Tagalog (ABAKADA) 

A a

B b

K k

D d

E e

G g

H h

I i

L l

M m

a ba ka da e ga ha i la ma

N n

Ng ng

O o

P p

R r

S s

T t

U u

W w

Y y

na nga o pa ra sa ta u wa ya

 

Later on, we adopted the English and some Spanish letters.

8 letters from the Spanish and English alphabet (c, f, j,  ñ, q, v,  x, z) were added to the our existing 20 letters of abakada

The Modern Filipino Alphabet

The way we pronounce the Modern Filipino Alphabet is similar that of American English Alphabet

 

Since I already told you the history of the Tagalong language and the Filipino Alphabet, I would like to introduce you to our new tutorial – Tagalog 101: How To Speak The Modern the Tagalog language.  So welcome, and watch out for our next module: How to say “How are you” in Tagalog. Mabuhay! (Long live/cheers)

 

 

 

 

Lessons in Mandarin 101: Tones and how you say “I’m sorry” “How are you” and “I’m good, thank you”

tones in Hanyu Pinyin

Since Singapore is a multi-cultural country, primary and secondary students here are required to take up a mother tongue class, as part of the curriculum. If you’re a local, the options include Mandarin, Malay, Tamil, among others. Foreign students might be exempted, but they are encouraged to try taking the mother tongue class first. If the student is really having a difficulty in learning the language, he has an option to shift to a different mother tongue class. The last option for a student is to take a foreign language course of their choice (French, German, Spanish, Japanese etc) from a different institution.

Ethan started taking Mandarin lessons since nursery, but since I’m not a speaker nor do I understand Mandarin, we really find it challenging. Mandarin is a very complex language for us and we are always overwhelmed by it.

So, why this post?

The reason for this post is to share with you some of the things we have learned from his previous lessons in school. Let’s try the easiest method first– the Hànyǔ Pīnyīn which is the phonetic system for transcribing the sound of Chinese characters.(sourtce:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A0ny%C7%94_P%C4%ABny%C4%ABn)

You might find this helpful if you’re really interested to learn, my kids and I are still works in progress, so we say duì bu qǐ (sorry) to all of you listening, if in case we mispronounced the words.  But we will try our best. Anyways, let’s just have some fun speaking and listening!

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Duì bu qǐ  by the way is how you say sorry in Mandarin. (source: http://mandarin.about.com/)

 

Wait! Before we start speaking in mandarin, we should learn the tones first.

Noticed the sign above the letters of Hànyǔ Pīnyīn? Those will be our clues on how we should pronounce each syllable. As you all know, the exact same words have different meanings in mandarin when you pronounce it in four different ways. We are currently practicing these tones, and it really is quite confusing, but here is a simple tip that Ethan and I came up with. Try moving your head as if you’re writing the tone symbol in the air.

  1. First tone –is the straight line above the vowel. For example…
mom starts high and stays there

 

2.  Second tone – is a slant line above the vowel, rising from left to the right, for me, it is like           when you call your mom, when you need something from her… like… ma? pa?

Hemp (a plant) starts at mid-range and ends high

 

3.  Third tone – is like a letter v on top of the vowel. The easiest of all. It’s like making your             voice dig in the air and rise again.

horse starts mid-range, dips low, goes back to mid-range

 

4.  Fourth tone- the opposite of the second tone. The symbol is like a slant from the upper               left to the lower right. A friend of mine says it’s like saying “NO!” with conviction, so we take         his tip.

scold starts high and ends low

 

Wait again! There is a neutral tone.

Neutral tone- If there’s no symbol on top of the vowel, it means it is in the neutral tone.

ma question particle neutral tone

 

Here is an example using the question particle “ma”

M: Nǐ hǎo ma? (How are you?)

E: Wǒ hěn hǎo, xièxiè, nǐ ne? (I am good, thank you, and you?)

M: Wǒ hěn hǎo, xièxiè. (I am good, thank you.)

 

Thanks for listening! 🙂

 

 

 

Kangaroo Jane and the big watermelon

She finally ate dinner!“My classmates laughed at me when I told them the title of my story…” Sofie told me eagerly . “They said it was so funny, I also made them laugh with my Kangaroo ears!”

Last week, my five-year-old daughter brought home a toy from her K1 class. Her assignment was to create a story involving Kangaroo Jane (the stuffed animal’s name), and show it to the class the following day.  She made up her story on her own and here’s how her story goes…

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This is the story of Kangaroo Jane and the big watermelon. Kangaroo Jane with Mommy Sofie

 

One day Kangaroo Jane told her mommy that she’s hungry.

 

And so, her mother cooked nice food for her.

 

But Kangaroo Jane didn’t want to eat.

 

She wants a watermelon instead.

 

“But Jane, you need to eat what’s on the table” “That is all we have!” said Kangaroo Jane’s mommy.

 

Kangaroo Jane followed her mom, and her mother felt so happy because Jane is an obedient Kangaroo.

 

Jane felt happy too!

 

That night, Jane’s dad went home for dinner.

 

And do you know what her daddy brought her?  Kangaroo Jane and her watermelon

 

The biggest watermelon a baby Kangaroo ever saw!

 

She was so happy that night.

 

She said to herself,”…they gave me watermelon because I followed mom. I am a good kangaroo!”

Kangaroo Jane with mommy sleeping happily ever after

And Kangaroo Jane slept with a smile on her face.

 

And then, she sleep happily ever after. The End.